Limiting driving distractions to avoid an accident

Distracted driving impacts more than just the driver and occupants of the car involved; pedestrians, fellow drivers and passengers are also endangered. Make a decision to ditch the following four types of distracted driving:

  • Daydreaming. Surprisingly, allowing your mind to wander while driving (even on your daily and routine route) can be the most dangerous of all distracted driving. If you find yourself driving on “autopilot,” pull off the road and take some time to recharge before continuing.
  • Cell phone or hand-held device usage. Especially when it involves texting while driving, using a hand-held device accounts for approximately a significant percentage of all fatal driving distractions. About a dozen states and Washington, D.C. have banned the practice. Save your texting or phone calls for before you leave and after you've arrived.
  • Outside activity. Just as in-the-car distractions, events happening outside your car can grab your attention and can lead to accidents. It's hard not to rubberneck or look at someone doing something interesting on the side of the road, but do your best to keep your eyes on the road.
  • Inside activity. Driving with friends is fun and makes a long trip easier to take, but five percent of distracted drivers were distracted by friends or other occupants. Minimize arguments or conversations that take your attention away from the road ahead.